Ways to use Moonglow in your next painting

Ways to use Moonglow in your next painting

It’s a deep dive into MOONGLOW! If you love the watercolor hue from Daniel Smith the way I do, you may already know everything I’m about to show you. But if not—you’re in for a treat to explore a color with many uses!

One of my YouTube subscribers commented this, so you can thank them for this post:

Tutorial: Ways to use Moonglow in your next watercolor painting

Watch the video below and scroll to the end to leave comments or questions — or click HERE to watch it on YouTube and leave comments over there. I read both dutifully!

Ways to use Moonglow

These paintings were sketched to show you approximately how they were painted (below)….if they’re available as originals I’ve linked them, and if they’ve been added to my BRAND NEW SHOP for prints, that’s linked too!

 

Moonglow is mixed with YO ithroughout

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ORIGINAL IS IN ARTIST’S PERMANENT COLLECTION

Moonglow is mixed with YO iand TRO throughout

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Moonglow is throughout shadows.

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Moonglow is mixed in treeline in back and shadows

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 More paintings with Moonglow

Tap on a link below each painting.

Moonglow is mixed with TRO and YO in the hare

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Moonglow is mixed with French Ultr. after ink drawing

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Moonglow is background color

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Moonglow is background plus some shadows in flowers

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Moonglow is everywhere – including the aurora borealis!

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Moonglow and YO throughout

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Moonglow is mixed with TRO in the rabbit

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Moonglow is mixed in building colors to push them further away.

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Moonglow is mixed iwith YO in sheep and Shepherd.

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Moonglow chimp…aka “The Thinker”

The chimp has been designated a thinker due to the intense expression…he has his arms crossed as he ponders the meaning of life!  🙂

This painting was a fun experiment! I wanted to paint something with a lot of Moonglow to help answer the request from a subscriber; I’ve used the color enough to know some colors that work well with it, and that I can render something that “should” be black in a way that gives it more life.

I’m mostly quite satisfied with the outcome – although I’d love to have been looser with my technique! The first wash is always nice and loose but I tend to get so tight and controlled in the end stge, so it’s a battle of style I think I’ll keep fighting my whole life. ha!

The chimp painting is available as the original painting HERE, or prints (and pillows, bags etc) HERE.

Don’t forget the fundraiser!

In my previous post, I launched a fundraiser to help pups in need of new furever homes. Check it out and shop for some Cricket swag!

Supplies

Some product may be provided by manufacturers for review and use. Compensated affiliate links are here at no cost to you. I appreciate your support of my work with your purchases! Full affiliate and product disclosure | My trusted partners in art

  1. House of Hoffman Palette 
  2. Daniel Smith Watercolors: 
    1. Moonglow 
    2. Yellow Ochre 
    3. Transparent Red Oxide 
  3. Brushes:
    1. Winsor Newton Kolinsky Sable Series 7 Round #10 
    2. Winsor Newton Kolinsky Sable Series 7 Round #8
    3. Winsor Newton flat 3/4 sable one stroke brush 
    4. Da Vinci Maestro Kolinsky Sable Round 2 
    5. Da Vinci Series 17 Maestro Long Needle, Size 9 
  4. Saunders Waterford Cold Press Sheets
  5. Artist tape 3/4″ 

How to draw black fur in colored pencil | Remembering Cricket

How to draw black fur in colored pencil | Remembering Cricket

Last week I heard about a sweet dog that passed away. Or rather than passed away, she was…deliberately killed. 🙁 She was bred to be a hunting dog, but when she was a bit too rambunctious and disturbed her mama’s hunting day, Cricket was taken to a gravel pit and shot. My heart just breaks typing this.

 

If any dog deserves a memorial portrait, it’s Cricket. The family’s kids will remember her, and hopefully the mama will live with regret for what she did and bragged about. But please, if your dog isn’t living up to what you expect, please just take it to a shelter. It may not be adopted from there, either, since we don’t have enough people willing to adopt dogs — but at least give the doggo a chance.

Enough about that. Let’s get to some of the cutest parts of Cricket – her fur!

Then we’ll talk about my shelter FUNDRAISER!

 

Tutorial: How to draw black fur in colored pencil | Remembering Cricket

Watch the video below and scroll to the end to leave comments or questions — or click HERE to watch it on YouTube and leave comments over there. I read both dutifully!

Underpainting with color

When creating black fur, or really anything black, I like to mix in some color – so it won’t look like just a blob of value but will have some “life” in the black.

I added a light grey, blue, and purple in the highlights of a smooth black fur area – then added the blacks. Mixing with blending solution helps to break down the pigment and get it to move with a blending stump.

 Even if you don’t draw animals – you can use this technique on anything that you color!

Dramatic background

I had one heck of a time getting her body to look right in the layout I had begun – so I opted to just get rid of it and make it black. Which turned out to be a good test with this new-to-me Strathmore Colored Pencil paper. It didn’t do an amazing job, but it wasn’t awful either. Definitely using blending solutions on this paper is the way to go.

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Fundraiser for shelter

I’ll be raising money for a shelter near the place where Cricket once lived – in hopes of saving other doggos who need help now! You can purchase Cricket swag and all the money I get from those will be donated. I’ll also be donating a % from pet commissions through the end of May. So if you’re interested in the swag:

  1. On my site 
  2. On FineArtamerica 

If you’d like a commission, drop me an email – we can discuss medium, size, etc, and I’ll quote you a price!

Supplies

Some product may be provided by manufacturers for review and use. Compensated affiliate links are here at no cost to you. I appreciate your support of my work with your purchases! Full affiliate and product disclosure | My trusted partners in art

What’s better: Black lines or implied lines?

What’s better: Black lines or implied lines?

I should know better than to ask what’s “better.” When it comes to art, there’s not always a “better!” But…..I tried asking AI what I should call this post, and it suggested I start a fight about what’s “better.” Argue away in the comments! ha!

Anyhow – today’s Colorado Craft Company release has two sweet stamps I asked if I could color up – there’s something about shiny metal planes that I love! And since I’m PARTYING LIKE IT’S 2024 (because we have aid going to Ukraine where I have friends anxiously awaiting our help!)…..I made my planes blue and yellow!

Tutorial: What’s better: Black lines or implied lines?

Watch the video below and scroll to the end to leave comments or questions — or click HERE to watch it on YouTube and leave comments over there. I read both dutifully!

Black lines

For me, black lines are more on the cartoon side – you can still make an image look dimensional, don’t get me wrong. But in real life there’s no black outlines defining the shapes we see! But some benefits:

  1. Crisper image
  2. Easier for new colorists
  3. Less worry about alcohol markers bleeding

What other benefits did I miss?

 

Implied lines

In my life as an artist I had always heard “implied” rather than “no” lines – no line coloring is a thing in crafting but honestly, it’s often not “no” lines at all. Even for my yellow plane, the top line by the highlight is still there. It’s just softer. Some benefits of implied line art:

  1. Lines disappear, so artist can alter the design (adding bolts!)
  2. Can appear more realistic
  3. Greater challenge to satisfy an intermediate/advanced artist

What else do you find as a benefit? 

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Cue the disco lights!

Students at Artventure told me just how hard it was to figure out how to sign up for the new class; and though I sometimes feel the ick of marketing (like I’m always shouting to the world that I’ve got a new class out!)……I really stink at getting the word out!

So bold and proud: Brushstroke Flowers is available – and it’s a card class! Pop over to see a preview video, get yourself a Buddha board and other supplies, and let’s get busy making beautiful flower cards shall we? CLICK HERE!

Colorado Craft Company Bloghop

As always leave a comment to be entered into the drawing! You can comment up until Midnight (ET) April 30th. CCC will announce the winners on May 2nd on their blog.

  1. CCC will give away one free clear stamp to a commenter on this post.
  2. If you use my affiliate link to make a purchase you will be entered to win the entire release.

 

Supplies

Some product may be provided by manufacturers for review and use. Compensated affiliate links are here at no cost to you. I appreciate your support of my work with your purchases! Full affiliate and product disclosure | My trusted partners in art

Brushstroke Floral Cards (Asian-inspired)

Brushstroke Floral Cards (Asian-inspired)

If you were here for part one – which was my review of a set of $1 brushes – you’ll know I was knee-deep, or perhaps elbow deep, in getting it all finished. And I’m delighted to report it’s finished!

Not so delighted that I was so overwhelmed with footage that I disappeared the footage for the little card paintings for today’s post – however it’s the very same loose process for the larger painting I have included. And I do show you the making of the cards! 

Tutorial: Brushstroke Floral Cards (Asian-inspired)

Watch the video below and scroll to the end to leave comments or questions — or click HERE to watch it on YouTube and leave comments over there. I read both dutifully!

Watercolor paper vs Sumi-e paper

Sumi-e is another animal entirely…not like anything I’ve ever painted on. It’s a process that needs you to just touch your brush and then let go and don’t fuss! Which is something I need to learn in painting anyway, but is more important for this very soft paper. 

The card below is on watercolor paper though – hot press. Much more the norm for me, though I generally love a textured cold press or rough paper far better! So all this is stretching me – and as mentioned earlier, I’ll do anything for mom, so that’s what I’m doing. She spent time in Japan and studied Sumi-e painting….I can’t do that right now but I can do “my” version of loose, simple flowers!

Don’t use water soluble inks

To attach the lightweight Sumi-e paper to something beefier like a cardstock or bristol, you need to wet the paper. And the Diamine ink I used in these next two just melted like buttah! Fortunately my “signature box” that blurred could be turned into more flowers, and then re-added after the mounting process had finished. WHEW! Saved.

Sumi-e after mounting

Oddly this paper seemed able to handle painting with much less bleed once it was mounted! That might get me to save detail and sharp edges for after that process is done. The one thing I don’t like? That has to wait overnight, and I’m not patient. LOL

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Watercolor works better

While watercolor does blur slightly (see the signature box below), it’s not terribly bad, and sometimes is nonexistent. Just don’t overwet or scrub over it with a brush, keep it simple.

Brushstroke Flowers Class

After several days of massive work – the cards are done! I’ve organized them and gotten some of the videos posted in class, more to come by the end of the day. Marathon, I tell ya! CLICK TO SEE THE CLASS

Supplies

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Can I paint with cheap $1 brushes?

Can I paint with cheap $1 brushes?

Can a brush snob like me handle SUPER cheap brushes? I’ve paid more than this for KIDS brushes, for crying out loud. What is wrong with me? ha!

Tutorial: Can I paint with cheap $1 brushes?

Watch the video below and scroll to the end to leave comments or questions — or click HERE to watch it on YouTube and leave comments over there. I read both dutifully!

My hot take

While these are pretty cruddy quality – I wanted something cheap I could use with inks. While I think washing out my watercolor brushes well keeps them safe, it’s making me more nervous over time with the good brushes – so these will do for now!

But just know that….

The hairs WILL fall out.

The “experience” doesn’t “feel” nice when painting. Not smooth IYKWIM.

They’re completely replaceable at the price.

I’m not one to tell you to go ahead and get cheap brushes, I can’t really fault these puppies for being awful. They still paint decently enough, although my slow learning curve with sumi-e paper could be the brushes’ fault, who’s to say?

Earlybird: Brushstroke Flowers class

If you think this is a class you might like, now’s the time to snag it! Brushstroke Flowers course lessons 1-5 —with 2-1/2 hours of teaching—are uploaded so  you can start gathering supplies and painting; the cardmaking lesson at the end is not yet finished though, so I’m letting you have access now for a little deeper discount than the real launch day on Tuesday. 

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Supplies

Some product may be provided by manufacturers for review and use. Compensated affiliate links are here at no cost to you. I appreciate your support of my work with your purchases! Full affiliate and product disclosure | My trusted partners in art