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Shalom: The Gift of Remembrance

“Tell it to your children, and let your children tell it to their children, and their children to the next generation.” —Joel 1:3

On pondering this evening, the theme for my day seems to be remembrance. This morning I found myself remembering the details of my day yesterday (sometimes quite a challenge), and struggling to write down what I did recall; I don’t want to lose a thing, so I have been trying to make notes as I go. I plan to create a scrapbook with not just photos and memorabilia from this trip, but the things God spoke to me throughout, as well as Scriptures that were preached at each site and others that came to mind during those visits.

After giving myself permission to miss the morning convention session, I took the 11am bus to the conference center where I’d meet up with my tour group for the afternoon. I got there early enough to take a wonderful walk around that area of town (very safe, no worries!). I met several locals, bought a newspaper, went to the ATM, and it felt very normal. I found what I thought was a subway station, but upon asking around for a subway map, I don’t think that was really a subway! When I found myself somewhat turned around (the area has many crisscrossing roads), an arrow-prayer seemed to set my feet to remembering where they needed to go.

We boarded our tour bus and were taken to Yad Vashem, the holocaust memorial. It’s a difficult place to describe; and a difficult place to be in. It’s a beautifully created place, full of powerful memorabilia of all sorts from personal items left by those who were executed in the gas chambers, to photos and videos, text descriptions (all available in Hebrew and English both), audio and music. I read the captions and descriptions for a short time . . . but found it overwhelming. I began to cry as I wandered the zigzagging hallways, stopping to look at a photo that caught my eye, or a piece of video, but most often turned away and walked slowly through the exhibit. My pace slowed, I looked at fewer and fewer of the exhibits, and the hallways seemed to go on forever and I just wanted out. The evil that was perpetrated on the Jews—and in the name of Jesus—was horrendous, and somehow seeing this quantity of information at once tore me apart inside.

Close to the end of the exhibits is a Hall of Names—a large round room with a “cone” above the center, that space covered with photos and details of those who died. The outer walls were lined—and I mean lined—with hundreds and hundreds of notebooks filled with the names and biographical details of those who perished at the hands of the Nazis. The sheer size of the room and the number of books makes the victim count so very real. And so very crushing.

Two other buildings follow a walk through the memorial: one is pictured below, a fire in a very large dark room, with ashes gathered up from the gas chambers, a place for those who died to be buried and remembered as one people.


The final building is the most devastating, and is dedicated to the 1.5 million children who perished. The exhibit is a very very dark, large, round room with railings needed to make your way through. Mirrors around the outside reflect the dozen or so small votive candles in the center of the room; the reflections go on and on forever as haunting vocals float through the space. The names, ages, and countries of the children are read one by one, in voices that seem to come from different parts of the room, and are in the languages of each child.

I left with a profound sense of loss, and my spirit drained from the visit there. I’m glad I went, but I know that remembrances of that memorial will be with me for a long time to come.

Our next stop was something called “Model City”—a huge model of the old city of Jerusalem! Talk about a wow. It really helped in orienting my brain to all that I’ve learned, and gave me a real sense of what Jerusalem was probably like in Christ’s day. It helped that our tour guide reminded us of places we had been, and those we would be going on in the last two days of touring. (Last two? Did I really just type “last two”? Now I’m bummed!)

My final episode for the day was our convention session for the evening. We began with wonderful praises to the Lord, led by Tommy Walker again (he rocks!) . . . and were treated to a solo by a Venezuelan man playing some sort of Armenian flute-like instrument. This is the instrument he used when recording music for The Passion of the Christ! His interpretation of O Come O Come Emmanuel could not have been more appropriate for this place.

Pastor Jack Hayford preached the Word tonight, including a prophetic message concerning the breaking of strongholds. The whole assembly then broke into small groups to anoint one another and pray for one another, and the man who prayed for me reiterated so much of what God has already spoken to me on this trip! It felt as if the Lord was telling me, “Okay, let’s give it to you again, just so you remember this when you get back home!”

So I’m off to write in my (paper!) journal about those things, to engrave them even more fully into my heart. Goodnight, all, and be blessed!

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Shalom: Entering His Gates

“Enter His gates with thanksgiving and His courts with praise; give thanks to Him and praise His name.” —Ps 100:4

Oh how I have waited to post a blog entry with this verse! We’re here, inside the old city!

I took the morning off from conference today; I am just so tired. So here are some photos from yesterday. I need to jet to meet the tours for the afternoon (We’re going to Yad Vasham, the Holocaust Museum), but I at least had time to process some photos for you to enjoy.

The Regency Hotel where we’re staying. That’s our bus driver Gabi on the motorized wheelchair—does he have a license for that thing??

The Garden of Gethsemane contains trees that are inexplicably 2000 years old.

We took the Palm Sunday Walk from the top of the Mt of Olives.

Entering Zion Gate!

Misc scenes inside old Jerusalem.

Inside the Jewish Quarter in an underground-type area on a street called (?) Cardo. Lots of places to shop as well as many excavated ruins from Christ’s time! I’m hoping to get back down there, I had to leave early to help a fellow traveler.
The approach to the women’s side of the Wailing Wall. These lower stones are the original wall, and people pray there remembering the destruction of the city and praying for the future rebuilding of the temple as prophesied.

Our tour guide Naphthali is so awesome! He’s a Levite, by the way.

This is the original flooring! The large stones from the temple fell and created the cracks you see. The single stone, upper right, was once the stone where the herald would stand and blow the ram’s horn.

The Southern steps—lower ones are from Christ’s day! They stretched all across the side of the wall. The steps are built in a musical pattern—one deep step, one shorter, and you couldn’t rush across them because of the irregularity, causing everyone to slow down to a more meditative pace.

The first evening of the conference, with Tommy Walker leading worship. He actually wrote a song while here, all about “Goin’ up” to the Holy City, how appropriate!

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Shalom: Shabbat Shalom!

There are six days when you may work, but the seventh day is a Sabbath of rest, a day of sacred assembly. You are not to do any work; wherever you live, it is a Sabbath to the Lord.” —Leviticus 23:3

I wish the spot I am sitting at had a better view of sunrise! This is all I can see from here.

“Shabbat Shalom!” is the greeting used here for Shabbat (sabbath) weekly here. People greet each other with that phrase in stores, on streets…even the tour site announcements on intercoms began with “Shabbat Shalom!”

Shabbat in Israel has been a real learning experience for me. It began Friday evening and lasted until Saturday evening—reflecting the rest God took during His work of creation. No work can be done on Shabbat, and many things here are arranged to accomodate that. El Al doesn’t fly. Stores and government services are all closed, with the exception of things needed for security and other urgent services. People do all their cooking ahead of time, and eat only pre-prepared cold foods. I got stuck in the “shabbat elevator” at our hotel—it stopped automatically at every floor (and does so all day every day anyway) so passengers need not press a button. Even the air conditioning and lights in my room have a shabbat setting—meaning they go off automatically so no switch-flipping is required. (Today I have to find out how to turn that off; the last two nights I got up regularly to get the air back on . . . the only way we found we could do that was to open and close the hotel room door!)

Even though these practices are quite foreign to my American sensibilities, what a witness to God’s command to rest! I am always busy busy busy. Even when sitting still I have a million things processing in my mind (or on my laptop!). Watching a whole country shut down for 24 hours proves that all that “busy-ness” is not required . . . life can be lived without constant work! (Who’d a thunk it?)

I’ve spent a little rest time with the Lord this Sunday morning out on the balcony of the hotel. Just sitting and watching, listening, drinking in this city that oddly feels comfortable. Like someone said to me last night, it feels like we’ve come home to a city we’ve never been in before. The promises made to Abraham are also given to Christians, grafted into the family of Abraham by faith, so we also are promised the restoration of God’s holy city, so that could be why. Yesterday I purchased a beautiful pendant; it is silver with mixed colours of roman glass in it, and the silver detail shows a fish grafted into the Star of David, with a menorah atop both. I loved it so much when I saw it, because of its reminder of my heritage with Israel as part of the family of God.

It’s been very quiet til just a little bit ago; I’ve been listening to crickets, and a dog barking somewhere in the distance. The soft rumble of a few cars is turning slowly into an occasional hum. A few birds chirp off in the distance, hopefully enjoying the cool morning air like I am, and watching the sky go from a slate greyblue to brighter sky blue, with a tinge of purple all around the horizon.

The view from our hotel balcony.

Well it’s about time to go off for another day of touring, and the convention begins this evening . . . I should be posting more pictures again when I get home, but depending on how crazy the schedule gets, time may be more limited for the rest of the trip; they tell us we’ll be busy busy busy so I guess that means Shabbat really is over!

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Shalom: Making a Way in the Desert

“See, I am doing a new thing! Now it springs up; do you not perceive it? I am making a way in the desert and streams in the wasteland.” —Is 43:19

Today we witnessed prophecies being fulfilled in our modern times! The Dead Sea is coming to life as we speak; 30 years ago it was completely undeveloped, and we witnessed new trees and agriculture, farms that are watered by newly appearing underground streams. There is a “way in the desert” (the highway we drove on) that did not exist before. People didn’t live there except the bedouins in tents. But now—life is returning to this formerly barren region, and God is blessing His people here.

Morning view from the balcony of my hotel.

Bedouin tent camps along the road beside the Dead Sea. What a hard life!
The history of Masada was absolutely fascinating, despite the 103 temperature and burning sun. I may have to do a bit of reading up on this whole piece of Israeli history; I never knew Josephus was tied to Masada, but I learned differently today!
Checkpoints—fewer and less scary than I expected, but still there. Soldiers at these checkpoints were friendly and waved to us.


Swimming in the Dead Sea is just plain weird. You can’t stay upright—the water forces your body backward or forward til you’re floating on top….great exercise for your abs to fight the water’s power!
This sign was in the Dead Sea parking lot. If only it were as easy as words on a sign . . .
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Shalom: Transitions

“Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise, in the city of our God, His holy mountain.” —Ps 48:1


Today was a day of transition—from the Galilee south to Jerusalem! Temps in the city are cooler, praise the Lord; though we’ll be going south to the Dead Sea tomorrow where it promises to be a scorcher. My amazing fact for the day: I was in the West Bank!?! I had no idea how large an area it covers, nor that many of the sites we’re to visit are located within its borders. So yes, Mom, your middle kid will be in the West Bank all day tomorrow, but it’s perfectly safe at the Dead Sea, so do not worry! 🙂

The Golan Heights has an amazing aerial view of the Galilee region! A lovely way to say goodbye to this beautiful place. Our tour guide gave us a very detailed description of this area’s history, it’s hard to follow but fascinating. And our bus driver Gabi deserves a HUGE round of applause! The switchbacks were sharp and many! (And the vehicles left abandoned over the side of these cliffs gave us even more appreciation for his driving skills!
Bet-Shean is another Tel (city built on a city built on a city). The photo at the top is me and our little climbing party at the top (Mark, Pat, Julie, and me). The “top” can be seen in the bottom photo—see that tiny trail going up that mountain?

The Judean wilderness—wow. Imagine this dry, empty, vast desert for 40 days and 40 nights. Not a shelter to be had. Dust devils flying around. Heat, heat, and more heat. If I couldn’t last 40 minutes out there, I know our Lord was “lean and mean” as Pastor Steve says—He had to be to survive that!

I got a chance to drink from Gideon’s Spring!

We got to visit Qu’umran today! Hot as all heck but wow. What a bunch of weirdos this bunch was, but the Lord preserved His Word by having them stash it in the cave shown here.
We’re here!!!!!! This is the view from Mt. Scopus.

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Shalom: Off to Jerusalem

No pics to upload this morning, just wanted to journal a few thoughts so far before we leave the Galilee.

It’s been an amazing journey so far. I can hardly believe we’ve only had two days of touring and I feel like we’ve seen so much–300+ photos already!

Before I left home, my hope was to really meet God here in a unique way. I’d spoken with many people who said when they hit the tarmac they could feel His presence, and I didn’t want to miss that. When we landed, the excitement about the reality of the adventure hit home, and I felt lik dancing and screaming and crying all at the same time, but I only managed applause when the wheels of the plane bounced on the ground, and it took til the morning sunrise on the Galilee to really realise this is not only where Jesus was, but that He is here in a very different way.

The sense I get from our touring around this region is an understanding of Jesus as a one-on-one Lord. I think in some way I pictured the disciples following Him around hanging on every word, but not necessarily understanding the kind of relationship they might have had. But the intimacy of this land, the small size of the lake that surprised me, the closeness of a synagogue site to a home–this was a shoulder-rubbing, neighbor-overhearing little town where Jesus really lived with His family and friends. I’m so glad He’s still that for me, and my mental picture of what that looks like is very different now!

So far the highlight for me has been baptism in the River Jordan. I don’t know how this journaling will come across, if I can explain it well enough, but let me try. I went into the water thinking of this as my declaration of love for Jesus. My action. And my action as an adult, because I was baptized as an infant, so this wasn’t re-baptism because that didn’t “take,” but it was because I wanted to be on record making this commitment as an adult, and where better than the River Jordan? So, as I said, this was me taking an action.

I don’t know why I didn’t expect God to make a move, too; but I came up out of that water a changed woman. I feel the power of God in a new way, as if I can see doing things I never thought I could before. Making changes in my life I’d partially given up on. Taking actions in areas I felt powerless to do a thing. Hopeful for something new. Does that make any sense?

It’s given me joy inside that is just pervading everything else. Yesterday when we were all exhausted, overheated, dripping with sweat, inside I still thought, “Let’s go see more!” I had an excitement when I heard “one more stop” even though my body and brain screamed “No!” And I did let my body and brain win–joined in with the others in bemoaning having one more stop to make. (I really was too tired, and didn’t want to upset anyone by being Miss Pollyanna!) But inside I still thought, “Yeah, we can do this!” Given crazy traffic jams they decided to cancel the last stop and try to go there this morning, but the inside and joyful me would have gladly put up with a late night. Now the task will be to allow that joy to squash the human side of me that wants to whine, but I’m guessing that’s strong enough that it will take a bit to overcome that!

That picture in my head of trying to let the joy of the Lord overtake the humanity of me has made me think again about a drawing we were shown in my Bible Study Fellowship this year. Picture a large circle, with a smaller circle inside it. If the large circle is your spirit, how big would the inner circle be that represents how much of your spirit that is transformed into Jesus-like-ness? As I’ve been processing the baptism, I’ve been feeling like the “me” part of that diagram has great hope to start shrinking now, and that is an exciting thought!

Well the sun is just about up so it’s time to go take photos, so I’ll leave you for now. My next post will be from Jerusalem, how exciting is that!

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Shalom: Race to Ancient Ruins

At the time of sacrifice, the prophet Elijah stepped forward and prayed: “O LORD, God of Abraham, Isaac and Israel, let it be known today that you are God in Israel and that I am your servant and have done all these things at your command.” –1 Kings 18:36

Today was a day of mountain-climbing, heat-bearing, and muscle-aching, stair-walking—and enjoying breath-taking views. We saw the Jezreel Valley from two angles, one from the Nazareth side (north east-ish), the other from Mt Carmel on the west. It’s amazing to imagine the Biblical prophecies that are going to happen in this area; my pastor has been teaching through the book of Revelations the past few months so we had a pretty clear picture of what’s to come! It was so hot all day, though, by the time we were heading home we were all pretty wiped out. Happily so, though, having seen and done a lot once again.

My two new little friends! Love these girlies! We all love chocolate pudding and swimming!
Views from Mount Precipice, above Nazareth and the Jezreel Valley.
Tel Megiddo is a city built over a city built over a city….successive ruins of many years of civilization. Facinating!
Mt Carmel was LOVELY–incredible views, beatiful floral gardens and statuary.
Oh what a beautiful surprise to get to dip our toes in the Mediterranean Sea at Caesarea! Half an hour was NOT enough time for this stop!

Another view of the beach at Caesarea; it’s odd to see people picnicking on ruins…?

Getting so tired, and SO hot—my photos are getting more artsy as I’m trying to maintain interest in my exhaustion!

Goodnight!
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Shalom: Exhausted with JOY!

“We were therefore buried with him through baptism into death in order that, just as Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, we too may live a new life!” –Rom. 6:4

It’s been a full and exhausting day—but a wonderful one! The temperature was 100F in the shade—and I don’t know that Israel really knows how to A/C anything the way the US does. (But even a bottle of water is refreshing when warm in temperatures like this!)

I met a lot more people today, both from my church and other Foursquare Churches, what an amazing family of God this is! Discussions during breaks, on buses, and at meals were substantial and spiritual—just my type. Mixed in with lots of laughter of course!

Here are a few photos from the day….it’s now time for dinner and I’ve worked up quite an appetite, so I’m outta here. Have a great night!

On the Sea of Galilee—what a beautiful time of praise and worship out on the water that Jesus sailed on! It was amazing to know that, unlike other disputed locations, this one is NOT disputed. This was where He spoke to the seas, walked on the water, and increased the disciples’ catch!

The Mount of Beatitudes was amazingly beautiful! It’s kept up wonderfully with lots of flowers; the photo in the upper right shows a banana field just above where the amphitheater drops down, where the Sermon on the Mount would have been proclaimed.

St Peter’s Fish! We had a fabulous lunch at the Ein Gev Kibbutz—St. Peter’s Fish is tilapia. Yum!

Naphthali, our tour guide!

Pastor Frank preaching John 21….and getting a blessing as well!

The highlight of my day….baptism in the River Jordan! God totally showed up–I have never had that kind of transformation of JOY!
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Shalom: Arrival (part 2)

“Delight yourself in the Lord and he will give you the desires of your heart.” —Ps 37:4

While my photos are slowly uploading (very slow connection here!) I thought I’d take a minute to tell you all how grateful I am to God for this trip—He has given me the desire of my heart! I never thought it would happen; I had financial obstacle after another, and just when I started sinking into depression about never being able to save the money for the trip, things turned around. Amazingly. Even my dejection seemed to be God’s way of proving to me that He is mightier than my troubles, because He just pulled meright out of it. He’s even willing to blow down the Puget Sound region in a giant windstorm if that’s what it takes to get me to Israel. (That’s a long story!) I just can hardly believe I’m here.

The evening we spent outside after dinner was so lovely, the weather is balmy and warm, but with a near-continual breeze. Looking out over the Sea of Galilee, and realising those were the same hillsides Jesus looked out onto day after day when He was here, that this was the lake He walked on, this was the lake Peter swam to His Lord cooking fish on the beach. . . it’s almost too much to take in, and I’m only sitting at a modern hotel. I can’t wait until tomorrow; we get to go on that boat ride, and visit Capernaum, and the thing I’ve been looking forward to so much, the Mount of Beatitudes!

One of our Pastors, Scott, showing us a “sign from God” about where to go for the bus!

A view of a Palestinian community with its minneret (taken from the bus).

A view of the Sea of Galilee from a switchback as we went down to lower Tiberias.

The salad bar and part of the dessert bar! I ate foods I couldn’t identify—those who know my picky taste buds would have been proud.


The hotel we’re staying at, the Gai Beach Resort in Tiberias. Photos taken after dinner at dusk, facing east.
Goodnight, sleep well!